Monday, November 23, 2015

More Than Just Accidents and Tools

Insurance is something of a contentious issue at the moment, particularly in regards to the current economic crisis which is causing many of us to cut back on cover we do not consider essential. However, with an increase in thefts and burglaries in rural areas of the UK, farm insurance is becoming more of a necessity - and companies are highlighting the customisable nature of their cover in a sector where each customer has different priorities.

Public Liability
Despite the specific individual needs of each farmer and their business, public liability cover is often considered a necessity when it comes to taking out insurance for a working farm or farmland. The reason for this is simply because if anything should go wrong (i.e. damage, injury or worse) involving a member of the public and for which you are held responsible, the cost can be ruinous and without insurance you may be forced to sell your business to satisfy the claim made against you.

Employers' Liability
Employers' liability cover is a legal requirement if people work for you, though the law does not state that you must have cover for yourself or a member of your family. However, employers' liability is there to give you piece of mind and financial security should an accident happen that is your responsibility.

Insuring your property against theft and damage is where farm insurance starts to become more tailored to your specific priorities, and the term "property" can mean anything from buildings, through machinery and vehicles, to animals (see below). With property insurance it is very much up to you to decide which property to insure and for what range of perils e.g. fire or flood.

Livestock is a very customisable insurance sector and it depends on what risks you want to insure against. Farm insurance cover options include fire, lightning, accidental injury, death, straying and disease. Various additional risks can be insured against including, for example, the loss of value in a bull if it proves to be infertile.

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